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Dating by radioisotopes

Half-life is the time it takes for one-half of the the isotopes to lose their radioactivity.It's the measurment for how long it will take for the radioactive material to become inert, and no longer dangerous.Founded in 2002 by Nobel Laureate Carl Wieman, the Ph ET Interactive Simulations project at the University of Colorado Boulder creates free interactive math and science simulations.

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Others had tried to find an answer in geological processes—e.g.the pattern was caused by the way the magma was emplaced or how it crystallized. But Drs Humphreys and Baumgardner realized that in other cases there were many independent lines of evidence that suggested that huge amounts of radioactive decay had indeed taken place.(These include the variety of elements used in ‘standard’ radioisotope dating, mature uranium radiohalos and fission track dating.) It would be hard to imagine that geologic processes alone could explain all these.Rather, there was likely to be an answer that concerned the nuclear decay processes themselves.From the eyewitness testimony of God’s Word, the billions of years that such vast amounts of radioactive processes would normally suggest had not taken place.So it was clear that the assumption of a constant, slow decay process was wrong.There must have been speeded-up decay, perhaps in a huge burst associated with Creation Week and/or a separate burst at the time of the Flood.There is now powerful confirmatory evidence that at least one episode of drastically accelerated decay has indeed been the case, building on the work of Dr Robert Gentry on helium retention in zircons.The landmark RATE paper, The paper looks at the various avenues a long-ager might take by which to wriggle out of these powerful implications, but there seems to be little hope for them unless they can show that the techniques used to obtain the results were seriously flawed. carbon-14, or has, over the years, commissioned and funded the radiocarbon testing of a number of wood samples from ‘old’ sites (e.g.Another dramatic breakthrough concerns radiocarbon. samples with Jurassic fossils, samples inside Triassic sandstone, and samples burnt by Tertiary basalt) and these were published (by then staff geologist Dr Andrew Snelling) in C further, building on the literature reviews of creationist physician Dr Paul Giem.In another very important paper, scientists from the RATE group summarized the pertinent facts and presented further experimental data. This effectively limits the age of all buried biota to less than (at most) 250,000 years.

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